Legal Insights & Practice Trends

The Canadian Bar Association
The redesign

A new look for National

By Yves Faguy February 27, 2015 27 February 2015

As you can no doubt tell, we’ve ever so slightly refreshed our website. Already, you ask? Well, yes, time flies, doesn’t it? Believe it or not, it’s been two-and-a-half years since we launched National online — almost an eternity in this quickly outdated environment.  Though the initial design served us well at first, it was not built with users on mobile or tablet in mind. So we made the move to a responsive platform, which means that the pages you see on your mobile device will adapt in size accordingly.

We also decided to go with a slightly different look on our landing page, principally by switching to a continuous scroll. Readers can now come to our landing page and seamlessly move on to new content, without having to click headlines and to wait for new pages to load.

We’ve also done away with some underused functionality and made improvements to our right column, where we can showcase some our top features, posts and videos of the moment.

Of course, we will continue to position ourselves at the intersection of news, debate and developments on all things legal in Canada and around the world. And we will keep you informed of the many projects undertaken by the Canadian Bar Association in its efforts to improve the nation’s laws, improve access to justice and chart a path forward for the legal profession in Canada.

A final word before we get back to business: In the coming days we will probably be ironing out a few kinks. Burt please let us know what you think of our changes, and how we can improve your experience here. And, of course, please contribute by sharing your thoughts about the issues discussed here.

Above all, thanks for reading us.

Read More
Blog

Today's legal headlines

By National February 27, 2015 27 February 2015

Here's a round-up of legal headlines for Friday, February 27th.

Egypt: Ottawa's 'sheepish whimpers' for Fahmy fall short: Amal Clooney

Legal Aid: Michael Mansfield QC lambasts UK Gov's glorification of the Magna Carta

Immigration: Bill C-51 defies key rulings on security certificates, lawyers say

Crime: Mexico captures its most wanted drug kingpin

Quebec: Judge refused to hear single mother’s case because of hijab

Ontario: Evidence ends abruptly in VIA Rail trial with neither suspect mounting a defence

Montreal: Crown seeks restrictions on Montrealer they fear may commit terrorist act

Securities: Conrad Black banned from Ontario boardrooms by OSC

Terrorism: A guide to terror cases across Canada

Environment: Exxon Mobil Settles With New Jersey

South Korea: Adultery Is No Longer an Affair of the State

Canadian Citizenship: Oath to Queen to remain law

Read More
Anti-terror

A terrible oversight

By Justin Ling February 26, 2015 26 February 2015

A terrible oversight

In what appeared to be a hat tip to judicial oversight, Defence Minister Jason Kenney told reporters last week that the government’s new anti-terrorism legislation doesn’t change anything to “strong system of oversight that has always existed” over Canada’s spy agency. "It doesn't give new powers to police or intelligence agencies,” Kenney said of the omnibus public safety legislation. “But rather to judges, to courts."

Similar, albeit slightly less categorical, promises were heard from Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney (“if there are any legal implications, the intelligence agency will have to obtain a warrant and judicial authorization”) and Justice Minister Peter MacKay (“judicial oversight is the backbone of these criminal reforms”). The message: Bill C-51 would require robust oversight from the courts.

Two experts in national security law, Craig Forcese and Kent Roach, are far from convinced.

Read More
Article

After Carter v. Canada

By Jocelyn Downie February 24, 2015 24 February 2015

After Carter v. Canada When it recently struck down the Criminal Code prohibitions on physician-assisted dying, the Supreme Court of Canada gave federal and provincial legislatures 12 months to craft new legislation to meet the conditions set out in its landmark ruling. Of course, the legislatures could do nothing, just as they did after the SCC struck down the criminal law on abortion years ago. But this would mean that, as of February 6, 2016, physician-assisted dying would be legal in Canada for those individuals who meet the criteria set out by the Court (subject to the general regulation of health services).

I leave the assessment of the political wisdom of choosing this path to the political scientists and strategists.  Here, I simply explore what the next steps for federal lawmakers would be if Parliament were to decide to legislate in an effort to respect the SCC decision and reflect the will of the electorate. The obvious questions then are: “what should this legislation contain?” and “how should the federal Parliament go about legislating on the issue of physician-assisted dying?”

Read More
End Of Life

Assisted suicide ban struck down

By Yves Faguy February 6, 2015 6 February 2015

Assisted suicide ban struck down

Read More
Article

2015 CBA Award Nomination opportunities

By National January 14, 2015 14 January 2015

2015 CBA Award Nomination opportunities

Read More
Article

Making a difference: Dale Hensley

By National January 12, 2015 12 January 2015

Making a difference: Dale Hensley

Read More
Article

Your National. Only better.

By Beverley Spencer January 7, 2015 7 January 2015

Your National. Only better.

Read More
Article

Exit strategy

By Global Administrator January 7, 2015 7 January 2015

Exit strategy

Read More
Article

Re-thinking the CBA

By Michele Hollins January 5, 2015 5 January 2015

Re-thinking the CBA

Read More
Article

Destination : the cotswolds of England

By National January 5, 2015 5 January 2015

Destination : the cotswolds of England

Read More
Article

Out of the office : the biker

By National December 16, 2014 16 December 2014

Out of the office : the biker

Read More