The Power of Perspectives

The Canadian Bar Association
Internet law

Hosting hate and limits to freedom of expression

By Justin Ling August 18, 2017 18 August 2017

Hosting hate and limits to freedom of expression

 

Following the events of Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend, The Daily Stormer has been forced to retreat to the darknet.

While the average person was likely be unfamiliar with the site, until recent events, it is infamous in alt-right and far-right circles for its virulent anti-semitism, racism, and all around offensive content.

The Daily Stormer has had its fair share of legal troubles over the years, but the site has managed to stay online.

That changed on Monday, when the site’s host — GoDaddy — announced they would be booting The Daily Stormer from its domain hosting services. When the site moved to Google’s hosting service, they received a similar notice: The site is a violation of the host’s terms of service.

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Annual meeting 2017

Maureen Whelly Mills: 2017 President’s Award winner

By CBA/ABC National August 18, 2017 18 August 2017

Maureen Whelly Mills: 2017 President’s Award winner

 

This year’s President’s Award went to Maureen Whelly Mills, who in 1974 became the first female lawyer to practise in Moncton, N.B. Whelly Mills was a mentor to former CBA President René Basque when he was just starting out, and encouraged him to become an active CBA member.

Whelly Mills was president of the New Brunswick Branch in 1996-97, and working from 1988 to 2012 helped to introduce land titles to the province.

“Her supportive and enthusiastic mentorship of her colleagues throughout the years has had a remarkable and enduring impact on countless professional lives and careers,” said Basque. “Our Association has benefited immensely from her dedication and service.”

The President’s Award recognizes those who have made a significant contribution to the legal profession; made a significant contribution to the CBA; or have made a noteworthy contribution to the public life of Canada.

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Annual meeting 2017

Caitlin Pakosh awarded 2017 Walter Owen Book Prize

By CBA/ABC National August 18, 2017 18 August 2017

Caitlin Pakosh awarded 2017 Walter Owen Book Prize

At last night’s CBA President’s Dinner, Caitlin Pakosh, senior staff lawyer at Innocence Canada, received the Walter Own prize for The Lawyer’s Guide to the Forensic Sciences. The book, conceived and edited by Pakosh, contains contributions from 34 Canadian experts offering a comprehensive examination of issues specific to the legal system which affect forensic sciences in Canada today.

The book, published in 2016 by Irwin Law, was chosen by the Foundation for Legal Research from a long list of 17 books, and a short list of five, to receive the $10,000 prize.

The Walter Owen Book Prize is designed to recognize excellent legal writing and to reward outstanding new Canadian projects that enhance the quality of legal research in this country.

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Annual meeting 2017

Resolving issues: CBA votes new bylaws

By CBA/ABC National August 17, 2017 17 August 2017

Resolving issues: CBA votes new bylaws

 

CBA members handily passed a major bylaw resolution at its annual meeting in Montreal that will fundamentally reshape how the association governs itself.

In moving the resolution, incoming president Kerry L. Simmons said the bylaws were drafted with a view to having a more efficient, accountable and streamlined association where a “reasonable amount is spent on our governance, not an unreasonable amount.”

Most of the debate on the resolution centered on the inclusion in the bylaws of a definition of diversity that would hold the association accountable to its commitment to have a board that better reflects Canada’s diverse legal profession.

Ultimately it was decided to table the issue and refer it to the CBA’s Equality Committee for help in crafting an inclusive definition to be submitted to a separate resolution vote at the next annual general meeting in February 2018.

The change to the CBA’s governance system and bylaws is the culmination of three years’ work by the Re-Think steering committee.

 

 

 

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Annual meeting 2017

Meet the new president: Kerry L. Simmons Q.C.

By CBA/ABC National August 17, 2017 17 August 2017

 

In the above video, Kerry L. Simmons, Q.C., of Victoria, talks about her priorities for her upcoming year as president of the Canadian Bar Association.

Simmons, who first became involved with the CBA in law school, promises to focus the association’s energies on building membership and completing the CBA’s governance and operational transformation.

Her message to member: “Use the CBA to become a better lawyer.”

She called upon members in attendance to spread the word to others, whether its because they see membership as a core aspect of being a professional, or as a way to build credibility in a practice area by speaking to government committees on proposed legislation, or working on a law reform project.

On the operational side, Simmons promised to focus on the sharing of funding among branches, CCCA and other functions.

“We will also develop a process for strategically focusing and co-ordinating our advocacy efforts at the national and federal level,” she said.

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Annual meeting 2017

A new beginning for the CBA

By CBA/ABC National August 17, 2017 17 August 2017

A new beginning for the CBA

The debate over how associations are best governed is at least as old as associations themselves.

Now a new chapter begins, as the Canadian Bar Association’s annual meeting gets under way in Montreal today with members in attendance either virtually or in-person to debate and vote on new bylaws, following a decision last year to adopt a new governance structure.

A new Board, with an emphasis on diversity, will begin its mandate on September 1, and will be composed of one member from each province and territory plus incoming CBA President Kerry L. Simmons, Q.C.  Simmons is taking over from outgoing president René Basque of Moncton, N.B.

“What's different this year is that hundreds of people are participating through local CBA hubs across the country to debate the resolutions," says Simmons. "The CBA is taking a more modern approach to listening to what its members are saying, and this is a big step in building a more member-centric and transparent association."

The changes are part of a larger effort by the CBA to focus on being more responsive to the needs of its members, taking a more client-centric approach to redesigning its product and service offering, including conferences and events.

 

 

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CBA Influence

Consultation report on political activities received charitably

By Kim Covert August 17, 2017 17 August 2017


What does “political” mean in the charitable context?

That’s an excellent question. The CBA Charities and Not-for-Profit Law Section posed it in a submission last year to the Canada Revenue Agency during consultations on political activities by charitable and non-profit agencies. And one of the four recommendations in the consultation report, released in March, is that the issue be clarified in legislation.

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CBA Influence

Lack of adequate funding for Federal Courts ‘untenable’

By Kim Covert August 16, 2017 16 August 2017


The CBA revisited the need for adequate funding for courts in a letter to the Justice Minister in early July which called for a mechanism to ensure ongoing funding for the Federal Court, Court Martial Appeal Court, Tax Court and Federal Court of Appeal.

Inadequate funding affects the independence of the judiciary and also becomes an obstacle to access to justice at a time when courts are coming under increasing fire for delays and backlogs.

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Justice

Access to justice and Quebec's dispute over claim limits in provincial court

By Yves Faguy August 15, 2017 15 August 2017

Access to justice and Quebec's dispute over claim limits in provincial court

 

There is a growing concern over a constitutional challenge by a group of Quebec Superior Court judges against the federal government and the province that may have profound implications for access to justice in Canada.

In their suit the judges are seeking a judgment (in Superior Court no less) declaring that the Court of Québec has exclusive jurisdiction only over civil claims under $10,000 (a figure that has been adjusted for inflation), in accordance with section 96 of the Constitution Act, 1867. Under current civil procedure rules in the province, the court can hear claims up to $85,000.

Montreal litigator and blogger Karim Renno calls the challenge justified.  “It’s an important constitutional question and it’s difficult to imagine who would be in a better position than judges of the Superior Court to submit the matter for adjudication,” he told Droit-inc (Our translation).

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Trade

Updating NAFTA's labour and environmental standards

By Yves Faguy August 14, 2017 14 August 2017

Updating NAFTA's labour and environmental standards

NAFTA talks begin this week, a challenge John Geddes notes that “has emerged, unexpectedly, as a defining issue for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s still-young Liberal government.” 

Today, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland was at the University of Ottawa to talk about Canada’s goals in modernizing NAFTA, namely by pushing for stronger labour and environmental safeguards into the core of the trade deal. “We are seizing this opportunity to make what is already a good agreement, even better,” was Freeland’s main message.

Freeland has in the past praised Canada’s trade deal with the EU and its labour and environmental provisions as model for NAFTA.

But in their primer on what to expect from the upcoming talks, trade lawyers at McCarthy throw a measure of cold water on those twin objectives:

There are two points of interest here. First, while both sets of US Objectives discuss incorporating the sections into NAFTA itself, and contain provisions requiring certain actions and panels to investigate and ensure commitments are met, there is no US Objective setting out proposed consequences for breach. CETA attracted a great deal of attention for being a “Green” free trade agreement because it included a chapter on the environment. However, without concrete enforcement provisions, including the loss of concessions up on a breach, these commitments remain window dressing. CETA, for all of its progressive claims, falls into this category: the environmental and labour chapters lack teeth.

Second, the US Objectives on labour do not deal with the freedom of movement of citizens or residents of the countries for business or other purposes. One of the key elements of CETA was a recognition that, to properly supply services, there had to be a guarantee for business travellers and business travel between the participating countries. There were also ground-breaking provisions relating to the framework for mutual recognition of credentials for professional workers (such as architects, engineers, or lawyers).

It will likely be difficult for the Canadian government to extract any concessions on this front from the United States. All the same, given the current trajectory of US demands, including broad access for service suppliers conducting business internationally, there may be limited room for liberalization for professional and business workers.

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Risk management

A new normal: Climate and cybersecurity risks in financial disclosures

By Yves Faguy August 9, 2017 9 August 2017

A new normal: Climate and cybersecurity risks in financial disclosures

Kevin LaCroix, discussing directors' and officers' liability, points to some telling signs of the times:

One of the fundamental principles on which our system of securities regulation is based is the importance of disclosure. The system is built on the notion that companies must disclose certain basic information about their operations and performance so that investors can make informed investment decisions. While the disclosures required are a matter of regulation and statute, investors’ and regulators’ expectations about what must be disclosed changes over time. Signs are that disclosure expectations  — and as a result disclosure practices — are changing rapidly in two particular areas: cybersecurity and climate change.

As if to underline the point, Australia's top bank is now the target of a shareholder suit over climate change risks. As The Guardian reports, the case marks a first test to gauge how courts will hold companies to account on disclosure requirements that should be identified in their annual reports:

The move comes six months after the Australian financial regulator warned climate change poses a material risk to the entire financial system, and called for companies to report on climate change-related risks as financial risks.

The sorts of risks the Commonwealth Bank might face as a result of climate change are diverse, said David Barnden, a lawyer at Environmental Justice Australia.

“CBA has exposure to the Australian economy in general. We could be talking about anything from extractive projects to the housing market, which might face risks from sea level rise,” Barnden said.

Reputational risks for the bank as the economy moves away from fossil fuels could also be significant, Barnden said, with the shareholders raising concerns about the bank’s position on funding Adani’s proposed Carmichael coalmine and associated infrastructure.

 

 

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Criminal law

Algorithms that predict crime need more public scrutiny

By Yves Faguy August 8, 2017 8 August 2017

Algorithms that predict crime need more public scrutiny

 

The predictive value of algorithms in criminal matters is obviously a controversial one.  Last year, the not-for-profit ProPublica newsroom published an investigative piece arguing that there is racial bias in a tool called COMPASS, used by courts in bail sentencing to predict the likelihood of people reoffending.

The case study found that black defendants are more likely to be incorrectly labeled high risk and white defendants low-risk, in large part because the algorithm itself tends to reflect existing social inequality and therefore reinforcing the bias. Ultimately, the study found that risk scores were unreliable in forecasting violent crime. The Chicago Police Department's Strategic Subject List, commonly called the Heat List, has also come under attack for its reliance on an algorithm that critics charge is assigning risk scores in an overly simplistic manner and without proper transparency (often because the owner of the predictive software will cite proprietary technology as a reason not to share details of its inner workings).

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